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A Ladder to the Sky
A Ladder to the SkyLBendotti (6)
Eh. Ok.

Having finished The Heart’s Invisible Furies recently, I was excited about this one. And sadly this one just didn’t do it for me. It was beautifully written and the story was interesting, but it was a rather unsatisfying read. Probably intentional as Maurice’s actions are despicable. Even more infuriating is that he gets away with murder, his only downfall was his guilt. Which was a nice end, but not enough to make up previous atrocities.

I was also bothered by a mistake that happens in the book. Edith’s first novel is called “Fear” during part 2, but in part 3 they refer to it as “Fury”. Also, Dash Hardy releases a novel called “The Codicil of Agnès Fontaine”, isn’t that one of Maude Avery’s novel from the Heart’s Invisible Furies? Which is fine, they are different books after all, but later in A Ladder to the Sky, Maurice picks up Like to the Lark by Maude Avery, which establishes her in this universe, thus creating a conflict with the other title.

A Ladder to the SkyConner (3)
Help me out here

So I love the book and I love Boyne. It and he are flippin' fantastic. But I'm super curious about the real- life characters of the book. I'd like to think of myself as semi-cultured, but I have never heard of anyone who shares the same name as those in the book. After reading through the comments though I saw someone mentioned Ackermann and Gore as actual people. Is this true? How much of their life is fictionally/ factually represented in the novel? Are there other characters as well? I'll do some research myself, but I would also love to hear what everyone else thinks about this device.

A Ladder to the SkyHayleyStenger (10)
Favorite

This book was one of my favorites this year. I loved to hate Maurice Swift and thought the change in perspectives was very different in a good way. I am curious about John Boyne now and how much of this comes from his own personal life.

Ltuntkee (13)
I felt the same way! I continued to hate him more and more!
A Ladder to the SkyCC (1)
Fascinatingly Psychotic

I rather enjoyed the different narrators throughout the book, it added a bit of mystery until the end. I was hooked by Maurice’s irritatingly persistent self-serving and pathological behavior; just when you think he can do no worse, he does. Seemingly sociopathic, Maurice shows some vulnerability and emotion at the end that make you almost feel sorry. The ending is a bit of a double twist; after everything Maurice still can’t help himself but to stick to his old ways. Boyne really hits on the frightening consequences produced by those with only regard for themselves.

Becky (31)
"Fascinatingly Psychotic" is the perfect description of this book. I agree with your thoughts. I absolutely loved this book!
A Ladder to the SkyJeanneLemlin (1)
Too crass

I liked the first section of the story, but I was disturbed by the second section, entitled "The Swallows Nest." I don't really want to read graphic comments on gay sex and the choices men have. I didn't continue reading and have gotten rid of the book.

kateniestrom (8)
The actions of Maurice are much more disturbing than any sexual description, Jeanne, and I feel sorry that you were unable to finish this insanely intriguing book! Personally, I couldn't put it down and the point of view immediately following "The Swallows Nest" was one of the most riveting sections. I encourage you to open your mind and try again because this is one of the best books I've read this year.
Jaime (14)
I do agree! Worth the read completely. And being disturbed and uncomfortable as a whole did seem to be much of the point.
KateKC (2)
^What she wrote. I *almost* put this book down, not for its gay-ness but for its showoffiness (that's literary fiction for you) and all the name-dropping, which I found annoying until I realized its necessity considering Maurice Swift's unapologetic and narcissistic traits. I was simultaneously repulsed and delighted with that awful human's actions, and that is what kept me turning the pages. Good grief, Boyne can write. I mean, he can WRITE. That said, I have this question: did Boyne have to get approval to fictionalize Vidal Gore and Erich Ackermann in this novel?
booknerd (10)
After reading The Hearts Invisible Furies I knew I would see this one through to the end. I liked, hated then loved that book. I found the sex at times a bit too much. I almost put it down but remembered how I felt after the last book. So I kept on and was rewarded with a book I really liked. I also appreciated the different narrators and enjoyed the chapters with Maurice at the end. While I didn't enjoy reading about all the sex, I understood that it was a big part of Maurice and his power of people.
A Ladder to the SkyAdamHolliman (6)
Relevant

There's a thematic characteristic that I think is relevant to every person's life in some form. I guess you could call it, Betrayal. From either side of this occurrence, it's something that very few can live down or forget for too long a period of time. I think the universality of betrayal, either regarding an idea or a person, is something that needs to be examined in every person's life. As you get older, the examinations come quicker and with more bite.

A Ladder to the Sky (2)
Repeated disappointment

The novel was engaging and sometimes a page-turner. Slowed towards the end. The main character’s inability ever to make a choice with higher moral ground was a repeated disappointment. I feel the ending would have been better as a tragic shocker instead of wrapped up in a nice neat bow. Clues to who Theo was instead of the author spelling it out for the reader would have been great. Overall a good read but I wasn’t wowed.

A Ladder to the SkyCB (9)
Really enjoyed this one

This book was interesting and original. I really enjoyed the read. I have read The Heart's Invisible Furies, also really good, which was one of the selections by this author last year. I plan to read some of his other books as well. Glad I made this my choice for November.